God the Better Artist

In this video, Aaron Ivey teaches from Jeremiah 18 about how God will never cease to shape His people into who He intends them to be.

Yatzar – God The Potter

In this video from August 2018 worship collective, Aaron Ivey unpacks the meaning of the Hebrew word “Yatzar” as it relates to how God shapes His people.

How to “Set the Table” in Worship

It is easy for us to catch ourselves gauging a service by how well the band played, how the tech team did, and if the congregation sang loud or a few people raised their hands. I fall victim to this mentality quite often, but leading worship is centered around trust. I am at least skeptical of someone’s directions if they haven’t been there themselves. Worship leading is the same way; you cannot lead someone where you have not been yourself.

We Must Be in the Word

Chris Collins talks about how, as leaders in our churches, and also as believers, we must be in God’s Word. The Bible helps us resolve conflict, fight sin, and trust God’s faithfulness in difficult circumstances.

4 Vital Practices for the Heart of the Worship Leader

Nothing is more vital for our churches, our families, our spouses and the people we serve (and serve with) than for our hearts to be healthy. Here are four vital practices we must have in order to make sure our hearts are constantly chasing after God.

Let’s Fill This Town With Servants

Aaron Ivey talks about Jesus’s servanthood, and how being a servant is an inherent desire of ours. We were designed and created for servanthood. Our aim should be for the name of Jesus to be lifted high and glorified.

16 Unexpected Ways Support Raising Affected Me

If you’re skeptical of support-based ministries or are nervously considering one, this is meant for you. I was often asked questions like, “Why isn’t the church paying you?” After raising my support, I have no question why.

Do You Know and Love Your People?

Jimmy McNeal takes a closer look at Romans 16. He points out that Paul knows, loves, and prays for the people in the church in Rome. Can we say the same for the people in our congregations? How would knowing our people change the way we lead them in worship?